Tuesday, May 01, 2012

YouTube: Bro. Gordon Brown Lion's Paw 'Real Grip' of a 'Master Mason'





Video capture from British TV of then Prime Minister Gordon Brown masonic gladhanding. This particular Masonic Grip is usually not used outside a 'tyled' lodge. But remember this is the same Gordon Brown who blew the last election by leaving his microphone on inside his limo as he disparaged a working class housewife & supporter he had just spoken to Live on National TV while seeking her vote. Bro. Brown was 'Chancellor of the Exchequer' under Bro. Tony Blair's Labour Government for a number of years.

Of course neither Freemason ever informed the British public about their membership in the Freemasons, the secret network they owed their entire political careers to.



Uploader Comment

is the guy with white hair Evelyn De Rothschild?
dave997 2 years ago

Certainly looks like it and would explain the boner in Browns pants...
SilverShieldGrp in reply to dave997 2 years ago




Wikipedia
Sale of UK gold reserves, 1999-2002

The sale of UK gold reserves was a policy pursued by HM Treasury over the period between 1999 and 2002, when gold prices were at their lowest in 20 years, following an extended bear market. The period itself has been dubbed by some commentators as the Brown Bottom or Brown's Bottom.[1][2][3][4][5][6]

The period takes its name from Gordon Brown, the then UK Chancellor of the Exchequer (who later became Prime Minister), who decided to sell approximately half of the UK's gold reserves in a series of auctions. At the time, the UK's gold reserves were worth about US$6.5 billion, accounting for about half of the UK's US$13 billion foreign currency net reserves.[7]

The UK government's intention to sell gold and reinvest the proceeds in foreign currency deposits, including euros, was announced on 7 May 1999, when the price of gold stood at US$282.40 per ounce.[8] The official stated reason for this sale was to diversify the assets of the UK's reserves away from gold, which was deemed to be too volatile. The gold sales funded a like-for-like purchase of financial instruments in different currencies. Studies performed by HM Treasury had shown that the overall volatility of the UK's reserves could be reduced by 20% from the sale.[7]

The advance notice of the substantial sales drove the price of gold down by 10% by the time of the first auction on 6 July 1999.[1] With many gold traders shorting, gold reached a low point of US$252.80 on 20 July.[8] The UK eventually sold about 395 tons of gold over 17 auctions from July 1999 to March 2002, at an average price of about US$275 per ounce, raising approximately US$3.5 billion.[8] By 2011, that quantity of gold would be worth over $19 billion.

To deal with this and other prospective sales of gold reserves, a consortium of central banks - including the European Central Bank and the Bank of England - were pushed to sign the Washington Agreement on Gold in September 1999, limiting gold sales to 400 tonnes per year for 5 years.[7] This triggered a sharp rise in the price of gold, from around US$260 per ounce to around $330 per ounce in two weeks,[7] before the price fell away again into 2000 and early 2001. The Central Bank Gold Agreement was renewed in 2004 and 2009.

Gold prices remained relatively low until 2001, when the price began consistently rising in a protracted bull market. By 2007, the price of gold had reached US$675, and the loss to the UK taxpayer was estimated at more than £2 billion, as the Euros bought with the proceeds had also risen in value.[1] The gold price briefly passed US$1,000 per ounce in March 2008,[9] before reaching all-time highs of $1,043.77 on 6 October 2009[10] and $1,048.40 on 7 October 2009,[11] by which time the loss to the UK taxpayer was approximately £4 billion. Gold prices continued to rise, passing US$1,100 per ounce in early November 2009.[12]

The decision to sell gold at the low point in the price cycle has been likened to the mistakes in 1992 that led to Black Wednesday, when the UK was forced to withdraw from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism, which HM Treasury has estimated cost the UK taxpayer around £3.3 billion.[1]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sale_of_UK_gold_reserves,_1999-2002

4 comments:

  1. eToro is the ultimate forex trading platform for beginning and advanced traders.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Quantum Binary Signals

    Professional trading signals delivered to your mobile phone every day.

    Start following our signals right now and gain up to 270% per day.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Are you looking for free Twitter Followers?
    Did you know that you can get these AUTOMATICALLY & TOTALLY FOR FREE by using Like 4 Like?

    ReplyDelete
  4. If you need your ex-girlfriend or ex-boyfriend to come crawling back to you on their knees (no matter why you broke up) you need to watch this video
    right away...

    (VIDEO) Have your ex CRAWLING back to you...?

    ReplyDelete

Plse. email me if you are having problems posting your comments.

Ecom spammers except.